MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----=_NextPart_000_00B8_01D71036.D0F4EDF0" This is a multipart message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_00B8_01D71036.D0F4EDF0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit CLARE O’NEIL MP SHADOW MINISTER FOR SENIOR AUSTRALIANS AND AGED CARE SERVICES FEDERAL MEMBER FOR HOTHAM E&OE TRANSCRIPT TELEVISION INTERVIEW SKY NEWS AFTERNOON AGENDA TUESDAY, 2 MARCH 2021 SUBJECTS: Aged Care Royal Commission Report; Reports to the AFP. KIERAN GILBERT, HOST: Let’s return now to our earlier story. The New South Wales Police, now confirming, that they won’t proceed any further with the investigation into the historical rape allegation against a cabinet minister. I was joined, a short time ago, by the Shadow Minister for Aged Care, Clare O’Neil, and I started by asking her what she thought the Prime Minister should now do about this. CLARE O’NEIL, SHADOW MINISTER FOR SENIOR AUSTRALIANS AND AGED CARE SERVICES: I’m not demanding anything I’d call a parallel response, right now, from the Parliament. I think the High Court set up a separate process for the Dyson Haydon matter that went before them when there were sexual assault allegations made there. I think each institution needs to come up with its own approach but, I would just say, Kieran, the fact that the Police have decided not to pursue this matter, I don’t think would be a great surprise to anyone who’s got some knowledge of how sexual assault allegations usually progress through the Justice System. Unfortunately, we know there are terribly low rates of successful prosecution of sexual assault cases and a lot of them bare the hallmarks of the allegations that are before the Parliament at the moment. That is, the historic nature of the alleged assault and the fact that, in this case, particularly tragic circumstances, in that the alleged victim of the assault no longer is alive. It’s just a horribly awful, heartbreaking, situation. I’m not going to suggest to the Prime Minister any specific course of action, right now. I think that’s up to him to determine. He has more information about this than I do and I don’t think it’s appropriate, where I sit, to be providing specific suggestions of a path forward. All I would say is, this is a person who sits around a cabinet table making extraordinarily important decisions, the Prime Minister needs to satisfy himself that this person is of a character who ought to be exercising power of this magnitude. GILBERT: Now, to the area of responsibility that you have, as Shadow Minister for Aged Care. A massive report, 8 volumes, tragically shows 1 in 3 senior Australians in aged care receive substandard care. It’s a shocking finding. Do you think, given the amount of money that needs to go into this sector, there should be a hypothecated levy, like the Medicare Levy, for aged care? O’NEIL: Kieran, I think the funding question is important. If we just step back, the Royal Commission Final Report shows, without doubt, that we’ve got an aged care system, today, that’s in national crisis. You mentioned one of the harrowing statistics - a third of aged care recipients, today, have had some kind of substandard treatment. The one that’s really stuck with me is that two thirds of people in residential aged care, today, are either malnourished or at risk of being malnourished. There are problems that go right through this system to its very core. Funding is obviously part of the solution here. We’ve had a government that has talked the talk about older Australians but then gone into a cabinet room and made decisions that have directly resulted in some of the problems that the Royal Commission Report goes into. We’re going to have to have a conversation about funding but, ultimately, Kieran, let’s just remember here, Labor is not in government. We’re in this unique position where whatever we say and think about this is, really, not relevant until we’ve got a government proposal on the table. The Government has told us that they’re going to bring forward some suggestions in the Budget and, of course, we’ll look at those and we’ll respond to them but, at the moment, it’s a little bit abstract. The pressure must be on Scott Morrison now. He has presided over the failings of this system. He says he wants to fix them, let’s see if he’s up to the job. GILBERT: How pivotal is it, to enable older Australians to stay in their homes longer? O’NEIL: It’s absolutely pivotal, Kieran. I have the great privilege of speaking to many older Australians at the moment about what their plans are as they age and how they’re thinking about this. Most people don’t want to go into residential aged care and most people don’t plan to go into residential aged care. What the Government has done, today, is basically take that decision away from older Australians. They have, effectively, rationed the Home Care Packages so that, today, there’s 100,000 Australians who are waiting, desperate for assistance, but not getting the support that they need. One of the most harrowing things coming out of the Royal Commission is that the people most in need of Home Care support are waiting the longest, on average, 36 months. If you’ve known many people at that older stage of their life, 36 months is a hell of a long time and your condition can really deteriorate. That’s what’s being allowed to happen at the moment. We need a big fix on Home Care but I don’t want to see this as an either/or option for Government. Residential aged care is core. Australians need peace of mind that if they are going to need to put a relative into this system, and they’re going to work with the older person in their lives to make that call, that the system is going to be respectful of the older person. Not even respectful but just look after their basic needs as a human being. Unfortunately, the Royal Commission Report showed us that’s not happening at the moment. So, both need to be tackled at once. GILBERT: Clare O’Neil, thanks for your time, talk to you soon. O’NEIL: Thanks so much, Kieran. ENDS MEDIA CONTACT: JACOB KAHANE 0422 723 491 Authorised by Paul Erickson, ALP, Canberra. This is a broadcast email - please do not reply to this email. This email is confidential and may be privileged. If you have received this email by mistake: (1) please notify me immediately and delete the email; (2) you must not use this email or its contents; (3) client legal privilege is not waived. unsubscribe from this list. This email was sent to iq@canberraiq.com.au why did I get this? unsubscribe from this list update subscription preferences Leader's Office Media Unit · Parliament House · Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (ACT) 2600 · Australia ------=_NextPart_000_00B8_01D71036.D0F4EDF0 Content-Type: text/html; charset="UTF-8" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable CLARE O'NEIL - TRANSCRIPT - TELEVISION INTERVIEW - SKY = NEWS AFTERNOON AGENDA - TUESDAY, 2 MARCH 2021
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CLARE O=E2=80=99NEIL MP
SHADOW MINISTER FOR SENIOR AUSTRALIANS 
AND AGED CARE SERVICES 
FEDERAL MEMBER FOR HOTHAM

 
 
E&OE TRANSCRIPT
TELEVISION INTERVIEW
SKY NEWS AFTERNOON AGENDA
TUESDAY, 2 MARCH 2021

SUBJECTS: Aged Care Royal Commission Report; Reports to the = AFP. 

 
KIERAN GILBERT, HOST: Let=E2=80=99s return now to our = earlier story. The New South Wales Police, now confirming, that they = won=E2=80=99t proceed any further with the investigation into the = historical rape allegation against a cabinet minister. I was joined, a = short time ago, by the Shadow Minister for Aged Care, Clare = O=E2=80=99Neil, and I started by asking her what she thought the Prime = Minister should now do about this.

CLARE O=E2=80=99NEIL, SHADOW MINISTER FOR SENIOR AUSTRALIANS AND = AGED CARE SERVICES: I=E2=80=99m not demanding anything = I=E2=80=99d call a parallel response, right now, from the Parliament. I = think the High Court set up a separate process for the Dyson Haydon = matter that went before them when there were sexual assault allegations = made there. I think each institution needs to come up with its own = approach but, I would just say, Kieran, the fact that the Police have = decided not to pursue this matter, I don=E2=80=99t think would be a = great surprise to anyone who=E2=80=99s got some knowledge of how sexual = assault allegations usually progress through the Justice System. = Unfortunately, we know there are terribly low rates of successful = prosecution of sexual assault cases and a lot of them bare the hallmarks = of the allegations that are before the Parliament at the moment. That = is, the historic nature of the alleged assault and the fact that, in = this case, particularly tragic circumstances, in that the alleged victim = of the assault no longer is alive. It=E2=80=99s just a horribly awful, = heartbreaking, situation. I=E2=80=99m not going to suggest to the Prime = Minister any specific course of action, right now. I think = that=E2=80=99s up to him to determine. He has more information about = this than I do and I don=E2=80=99t think it=E2=80=99s appropriate, where = I sit, to be providing specific suggestions of a path forward. All I = would say is, this is a person who sits around a cabinet table making = extraordinarily important decisions, the Prime Minister needs to satisfy = himself that this person is of a character who ought to be exercising = power of this magnitude. 

GILBERT: Now, to the area of responsibility that you = have, as Shadow Minister for Aged Care. A massive report, 8 volumes, = tragically shows 1 in 3 senior Australians in aged care receive = substandard care. It=E2=80=99s a shocking finding. Do you think, given = the amount of money that needs to go into this sector, there should be a = hypothecated levy, like the Medicare Levy, for aged care?

O=E2=80=99NEIL: Kieran, I think the funding question is = important. If we just step back, the Royal Commission Final Report = shows, without doubt, that we=E2=80=99ve got an aged care system, today, = that=E2=80=99s in national crisis. You mentioned one of the harrowing = statistics - a third of aged care recipients, today, have had some kind = of substandard treatment. The one that=E2=80=99s really stuck with me is = that two thirds of people in residential aged care, today, are either = malnourished or at risk of being malnourished. There are problems that = go right through this system to its very core. Funding is obviously part = of the solution here. We=E2=80=99ve had a government that has talked the = talk about older Australians but then gone into a cabinet room and made = decisions that have directly resulted in some of the problems that the = Royal Commission Report goes into. We=E2=80=99re going to have to have a = conversation about funding but, ultimately, Kieran, let=E2=80=99s just = remember here, Labor is not in government. We=E2=80=99re in this unique = position where whatever we say and think about this is, really, not = relevant until we=E2=80=99ve got a government proposal on the table. The = Government has told us that they=E2=80=99re going to bring forward some = suggestions in the Budget and, of course, we=E2=80=99ll look at those = and we=E2=80=99ll respond to them but, at the moment, it=E2=80=99s a = little bit abstract. The pressure must be on Scott Morrison now. He has = presided over the failings of this system. He says he wants to fix them, = let=E2=80=99s see if he=E2=80=99s up to the job. 

GILBERT: How pivotal is it, to enable older Australians = to stay in their homes longer?

O=E2=80=99NEIL: It=E2=80=99s absolutely pivotal, = Kieran. I have the great privilege of speaking to many older Australians = at the moment about what their plans are as they age and how = they=E2=80=99re thinking about this. Most people don=E2=80=99t want to = go into residential aged care and most people don=E2=80=99t plan to go = into residential aged care. What the Government has done, today, is = basically take that decision away from older Australians. They have, = effectively, rationed the Home Care Packages so that, today, = there=E2=80=99s 100,000 Australians who are waiting, desperate for = assistance, but not getting the support that they need. One of the most = harrowing things coming out of the Royal Commission is that the people = most in need of Home Care support are waiting the longest, on average, = 36 months. If you=E2=80=99ve known many people at that older stage of = their life, 36 months is a hell of a long time and your condition can = really deteriorate. That=E2=80=99s what=E2=80=99s being allowed to = happen at the moment. We need a big fix on Home Care but I don=E2=80=99t = want to see this as an either/or option for Government. Residential aged = care is core. Australians need peace of mind that if they are going to = need to put a relative into this system, and they=E2=80=99re going to = work with the older person in their lives to make that call, that the = system is going to be respectful of the older person. Not even = respectful but just look after their basic needs as a human being. = Unfortunately, the Royal Commission Report showed us that=E2=80=99s not = happening at the moment. So, both need to be tackled at once.

GILBERT: Clare O=E2=80=99Neil, thanks for your time, = talk to you soon.

O=E2=80=99NEIL: Thanks so much, Kieran.
 
ENDS
 
MEDIA CONTACT: JACOB KAHANE 0422 723 = 491
=09

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This = is a broadcast email - please do not reply to this email.

This email is confidential and may be privileged. If you have received = this email by mistake: (1) please notify me immediately and delete the = email; (2) you must not use this email or its contents; (3) client legal = privilege is not waived.

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